Bring Back Our Girls…

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    The phrase ‘Bring back our girls’ is getting increasingly popular in Nigeria. Even on twitter, the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls is currently trending.
      What does this phrase represent?
      About two weeks ago (April 14th), gunmen from the radical terrorist group, Boko Haram raided a secondary school in Chibok, Borno state, Northeastern Nigeria, and kidnapped more than two hundred girls. The girls were mostly between the ages of 16 – 18 and were preparing for their final examinations. The group, whose name means “Western education is forbidden” in the local Hausa language, has staged a wave of attacks in northern Nigeria in recent years, with an estimated 1,500 killed in the violence and subsequent security crackdown this year alone. Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau first threatened to treat captured women and girls as slaves in a video released in May 2013.
It fuelled concern at the time that the group was adhering to the ancient Islamic belief that women captured during war are
slaves with whom their “masters” can have sex.
     Recently, distressing reports were gotten that some of the girls have been forced to marry these terrorists. It was said that the girls were sold off for marriage for $12. Reports of the mass marriage came from a group that meets at dawn each day not far from the charred remains of the school. The ragtag gathering of fathers, uncles, cousins and nephews pool money for fuel before venturing unarmed into the thick forest, or into border towns that the militants have terrorised for months. On Sunday, the searchers were told that the students had been divided into at least three groups, according to farmers and villagers who had seen truckloads of girls moving around the area. One farmer said the insurgents had paid leaders dowries and fired celebratory gunshots for several minutes after conducting mass wedding ceremonies on Saturday and Sunday. There are fears that these girls could be raped and subjected to other forms of sexual and domestic violence.

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   Many Nigerians expressing concern and worry over the government’s handling of the situation, took to the streets in protest, calling on the government to ‘bring back our girls’.
 
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Some devastated parents of the kidnapped girls.

Over 500 Nigerian Women on Wednesday defied heavy rainfall to protest the abduction of about 234 female students at the National Assembly. The women  carried various placards with inscriptions such as – “Rescue our Chibok girls, “Bring back our girls alive,” “Where are my sisters,” “Let peace and justice reign,” …

Where are these girls?
    Reports claim that they are in Sambisa forest, Borno state, where the terrorists live freely in camps. Boko Haram camps in Sambisa are not hidden. The terrorists camp in clear sight.
The camp seen housed thousands of terrorists and their abducted families, up to 3000 people by conservative estimates. The terrorists were seen walking freely in the camps, living a very normal life.
Women were seen in the camps, these included the hundreds of women who have been abducted over the years.
  (Abusidiqu.com)
This report has sparked so many questions:
If these camps are not hidden, why is the Government not doing anything to directly tackle these insurgents?
Is the Army afraid of being out powered by the militants?
Are there saboteurs that warns the militants of imminent attacks by the army which enables them to flee and return later?

  The Kidnap of these school children is a very gross human rights violation and I am particularly worried about the fate of these girls. As it is common with rebels and militants, these girls are most likely to be raped, sexually and physically abused, forced to marry, used as slaves or even sold off! The faster the Government of Nigeria and the international community acts, the better. Two weeks is already a very long time, and one can only imagine what has happened and what is happening to these young school girls. There is a need for quick and urgent actions to ensure that these girls are returned alive to their already devastated families.
#BringBackOurGirls.

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10 thoughts on “Bring Back Our Girls…

    […] French colony and close to a million have been displaced.      This also directs my mind to the mass kidnaping of almost 300 girls in Nigeria by the radical islamic sect, Boko Haram. These school girls have been missing for more […]

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      Monica bautista said:
      May 5, 2014 at 5:13 pm

      I am disgust by the fact that we are spending so much resources in trying to find a plane for more than a month and 200 girls are kidnaped and nobody does nothing. What is wrong with the United Nations. How united they really are if the do not care for the lives of this girls. They could be your daughters. Do something

      Liked by 1 person

        lotenna responded:
        May 5, 2014 at 6:18 pm

        Thanks, Monica for taking time to leave a comment.
        The United Nations should really do something because this is a gross human rights violation but the Nigerian Government has not shown real determination to tackle this issue.
        However, I heard that UN special envoy on girls education and Former British prime minister, Gordon Brown will be coming to Nigeria concerning the situation.

        Like

    george said:
    May 5, 2014 at 8:16 pm

    Can not some authority offer to ‘buy’ outright all those captured and just pay the 3000.00 dollars to return them to their families? We can fight with the captors later. Even if they demanded 10,000.00 it would be an incredible bargain under the circumstances. I am a layman in international relations but I am desperate in my thinking.

    Liked by 1 person

      lotenna responded:
      May 5, 2014 at 11:41 pm

      Thanks George for dropping by! I find your opinion interesting and I really wish that could happen but things don’t really work that way. The radical group, Boko Haram will definitely not sell the girls to ‘some authority’. Also, the money is not really an issue. Boko Haram is fighting for a cause. They didn’t kidnap the girls with the sole aim of making money.

      Like

    […] and internationally, with many calling for the release of these girls. Recently, I wrote about the Bring back our girls campaign in Nigeria; how many Nigerians (including those in diaspora) and even other concerned […]

    Like

    george said:
    May 6, 2014 at 5:01 pm

    Most Americans have no idea what Boko Haram’s demands are. What is driving them to this madness?
    What explanations are there for radical actions such as these? Is it land, water, natural resources such as
    gold, diamonds? Or is this Christian verses Muslim friction? Does keeping women from higher education promote Boko Haram’s SOAL goal? What else do they require? I is not my intent to identify with them but just need a motive for their crimes.

    Liked by 1 person

      lotenna responded:
      May 6, 2014 at 5:56 pm

      I completely understand your concerns. Many of us are equally disturbed.
      The word, ‘Boko Haram’ is in a native Nigeria language called Hausa and is translated to ‘Western Education is Sin’. This radical group is against any form of western education and also want to establish a zone/state governed by radical Islamic Sharia law in Northern Nigeria. It is definitely not a Christian-muslim friction because they also attack fellow muslims that oppose or speak against them. They’ve also bombed several mosques too.

      Like

    philipfontana said:
    May 9, 2014 at 2:32 am

    Lotenna, Nice website as I explore it! Keep up the good writing. Thanks for following my excuseusforliving.com Phil

    Like

      lotenna responded:
      May 9, 2014 at 7:02 pm

      You’re welcome, Philip.! Thanks for reading and the nice comment.

      Like

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