Doctors risking their lives to fight Ebola

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Doctors caring for an Ebola patient

           The Ebola disease is considered to be one of the world’s deadliest. First, because Ebola is incurable and also because the disease spreads very easily. More than 660 people of the 1,100 who have fallen sick with Ebola have died, in the worst outbreak of the haemorrhagic fever on record. Just body contact with a patient can transfer the disease. Ebola is a disease that many doctors and health workers will like to stay away from. However, few others are risking their lives to combat this monstrous disease. Sadly, three doctors who have been treating Ebola virus victims have been infected with the virus and are now battling for their lives.
         I will share the story of these three doctors who have ignored all risks and fears to care for the sick and dying Ebola patients, whom most of their colleagues prefer to avoid.
      
   Dr KENT BRANTLY
         ‘God’s going to deliver me from this but even if he doesn’t… I have no regrets’. These were the words of Dr Kent Brantly, a 33 year old American working for the charity organization, Samaritans Purse to combat Ebola in Liberia.

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Devoted: Kent Brantly, pictured with his wife Amber and their two children, contracted Ebola while working with patients in Liberia. He and his family chose to stay in the country even after Ebola began to spread.

Dr Sheikh Umar Khan
        Sheikh Khan is one of the three senior doctors that have been diagnosed with the Ebola virus disease within a week. The Sierra Leone leading Ebola specialist, Dr Sheikh Umar Khan tested positive last week, and is being treated at a Medecins Sans Frontieres clinic. Thankfully, he is expected to survive.
   
       

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Dr. Samuel Brisbane
    Unfortunately, Dr. Samuel became the first Liberian doctor to die in the outbreak the World Health Organization says. A Ugandan doctor working in the country died earlier this month. Brisbane, who once served as a medical adviser to former Liberian President Charles Taylor, was working as a consultant with the internal medicine unit at the country’s largest hospital, the John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center in Monrovia.  After falling ill with Ebola, he was taken to a treatment center on the outskirts of the capital, where he died.

     These brave and courageous doctors with large hearts have sacrificed their own lives and health to help fight this threatening and scary disease. We must recognize the great work they are doing and keep praying for them. Its a great pity that we lost Dr Sam. May the Lord rest his soul.

100 people killed in Gaza today

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              I’m deeply distressed by the continued killings and bloodshed in Gaza. Today alone, about a hundred people, mostly innocent civilians lost their lives during an intense Israeli attack! The death toll from Israel-Gaza war has now reached 1,178 with at least 100 killed since midnight on Tuesday. As it stands now, more than 6,800 Gazans had been injured. The latest Israeli attack hit the only power station in Gaza, leaving the whole of Gaza strip without electricity! Of course, this is going to affect all aspect of life in gas… It will result in water shortages, affect businesses… But more frightening is its effect on hospitals and also, how will people be able to call for help if there is an attack? This situation in Gaza now isn’t looking good at all and I fear that Gaza will be engulfed in a humanitarian crises if power isn’t restored. This is such an unfair attack from Israel. Why worsen the already critical situation in Gaza by cutting off power? How are the poor Gazans supposed to get by?
        It is also heart breaking to know that even children are being killed in several Israeli attacks.
       Here is a picture of a child killed in one of these attacks…

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      See pictures of anguished relatives of dead victims…

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          Let’s now ask ourselves, “Is this fair? Do we want to keep living in a world like this?”
      

Sign the petition, Save the Gaza Children

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     The war in Gaza has been a major concern to many, everyone is talking about it, it makes headlines in all newspapers and TV stations… But what we are not talking about is the ‘Children in Gaza’.
     The Israel-Gaza conflict‘s death toll has now exceeded 1,000, most of them Palestinians, including innocent young children. These young children are going through a lot: some are being killed, others are injured or loose their parents to the seemingly unending conflict. Most of them no longer go to school, they do not play freely anymore, they don’t feel safe, there’s always a sense of danger, they’re always on the run… I worry so much about them, just as I worry about the Syrian children whose condition almost brings tears to my eyes and leaves me frustrated that I can’t do much to change the situation.
       Here’s a picture of Palestinian children fleeing after an Israeli attack

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… And Palestine Girls weeping after their father was killed in an attack

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           We can’t keep silent and watch all these happen. Please, let’s fight for these innocent children. Sign  SAVE THE CHILDREN petition to push for a cease fire in order to provide aid to these children who desperately need it.

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           Please, sign the petition here: Save The Gaza Children Petition. I have signed mine, please sign yours. Together, we can bring relief to these young children. Thank you.

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First case of Ebola reported in Lagos, Nigeria

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            The spread of Ebola virus in West Africa is getting more frightening. Many people are now asking, ‘What is Ebola?‘  ‘How can Ebola be cured?’ People are getting more interested as more cases make the news.  Africa’s most populous city, Lagos has gotten its first case of the Ebola virus.  A man has died of ebola in Lagos, the first confirmed case of the highly contagious and deadly virus in Lagos.
          The man, Patrick Sawyer, a 40-year-old Liberian civil servant, collapsed on arrival in Nigeria’s main airport on Sunday. His condition rapidly deteriorated before he died. His sister is believed to have died of Ebola one month ago.  The death marks a new and alarming cross-border spread of the disease that has now become the world’s biggest epidemic, spread across three west African countries. At least 660 people have died in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since Ebola was first diagnosed in February.
        The pathogen is passed through contact with bodily fluids of infected patients, and has no known cure, although chances of survival improve dramatically with early detection and treatment.
        Personally, I worry about the virus and the spread of such deadly incurable disease. However, I worry more about the stigmatization and ostracism that is now associated with the disease. It has been likened to the early days of HIV/AIDS. Ebola disease isn’t curable and it is transmitted through body fluids like sweat, saliva, semen. Hence, people tend to avoid sufferers due to the fear of contamination. Please, if you know anyone suffering from Ebola disease, do not treat the person like an outcast or leper. Show love and try to get medical help for such individual as fast as possible.
          My message is, as it has always been, ” Show love, Everyone deserves to be happy. Together, we can make the world a better place.”

UNHCR and the burden of caring for C.A.R refugees

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       A severely malnourished Central African Republic child refugee.

         The C.A.R crises is one of the most under funded humanitarian crises in the world, and the United Nations High Commission for refugees (UNHCR) is struggling to keep up with the needs of thousands of refugees in the crises troubled county.
      Just this week, UNHCR together with 16 other humanitarian agencies
revised the Regional Refugee Response Plan for the C.A.R situation, seeking US$210 million to assist the growing refugee numbers in four asylum countries: Cameroon, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Republic of Congo – until the end of the year.
    More than 357,000 people have fled CAR for the four host countries since the crisis started in December 2012. This number includes some 160,000 people who left after clashes intensified last year. 118,000 are in Cameroon, 17,500 in Chad, over 15,000 in the DRC and 9,000 in the Republic of Congo.
“The new refugees show signs of the brutal violence they have escaped in C.A.R. They have walked for weeks through the forests with little to eat or drink. In April and May, as many as 40 per cent of all the new refugees, children as well as adults, were suffering from malnutrition,” UNHCR spokesman
Babar Baloch told journalists in Geneva on Tuesday. “We fear that for some children the assistance may be coming too late.”